According to comScore, a leader in digital marketing intelligence, their recently released online video rankings metrics report found Google video property sites ranked first with 13.1 billion videos accounting for 43.2% of all videos viewed online. Hulu ranked quite far behind in second with 3.2% of all online videos viewed, followed by Microsoft sites ranked third with 2.1%, and Yahoo! sites at 1.2%.

Top U.S. Online Video Content Properties* by Videos Viewed April 2010 Total U.S. – Home/Work/University Locations Source: comScore Video Metrix
Property Videos (000) Share of Videos (%)
Total Internet : Total Audience 30,317,131 100.0
Google Sites 13,087,462 43.2
Hulu 958,176 3.2
Microsoft Sites 643,711 2.1
Viacom Digital 383,776 1.3
Yahoo! Sites 370,947 1.2
Vevo 331,730 1.1
Fox Interactive Media 320,372 1.1
CBS Interactive 316,930 1.0
Turner Network 304,729 1.0
AOL LLC 237,356 0.8
*Rankings based on video content sites; excludes video server networks. Online video includes both streaming and progressive download video.

With Google’s proposed introduction of Google TV, a combination of TV and the Internet, what impact will it have on the global entertainment industry? Google TV would open access to millions of video channels online, and with video-sharing communities growing rapidly such as YouTube who experiences 24 hours of new video uploaded every minute, viewers will no longer be confined to the current limitations of their set top box. TV shows and movie downloading are so prevalent, this may pose a dilemma for pay TV companies.   It was also found that Tremor Media ranked as the top video ad network with a reach of 92.6 million viewers, making up 52.1% of the total video viewing audience. Amid corporations investing millions on 10 second ads, looking to more cost effective channels like online video may be a more viable and sustainable strategy in the future. Technology is dynamic and how companies utilise the relevant channels will determine how well they continue to stay in the game. Could this see the end of Pay TV, or will we see the Pay TV model evolve into something else?